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Top Ten Myths in International Family Law

There are a lot of myths and misconceptions about international family law issues. Here is our top 10:

International Forum on Online Courts London, December 2018: an international family lawyer’s perspective

Professor David Hodson OBE MICArb, Partner, The International Family Law Group, provides a family lawyer’s perspective of the matters arising at the inaugural International Forum on Online Courts.

Restrictions on international travel if child support in arrears

In some countries (for example, in certain states in America) your ability to travel and obtain a passport can be restricted or temporarily removed if you fail to make payment of child maintenance over a set amount.  In late 2018, changes were made to child support legislation in England (the insertion of s39B to 39G of the Child Support Act 1991) which means that your ability to travel may be impacted in a similar fashion if you fail to pay child maintenance. 

Crucial new guidance regarding Intercountry Adoption

The Hague Conference on Private International Law has recently published extremely helpful guidance on the interpretation of habitual residence and scope of the 1993 Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (‘the Convention’).

Commentary on the House of Commons Justice Committee Report on implications of Brexit for the justice system

Overview

 

Replacing the Apostille – an overhaul of legalisation in the EU

The present method for public documents to be authenticated for the purposes of being presented to a foreign jurisdiction is by way of an Apostille, a certificate of legal authenticity. An Apostille certificate is issued by government, attached to a legal document and confirms that the stamp, seal or signature on that document is genuine.  It can be a fairly complicated process.

The process is found in the Hague Convention of 5 October 1961 and EU regulation 1024/2012

Replacing the Apostille – an overhaul of legalisation in the EU

The present method for public documents to be authenticated for the purposes of being presented to a foreign jurisdiction is by way of an Apostille, a certificate of legal authenticity. An Apostille certificate is issued by government, attached to a legal document and confirms that the stamp, seal or signature on that document is genuine.  It can be a fairly complicated process.

The process is found in the Hague Convention of 5 October 1961 and EU regulation 1024/2012

iFLG sets up Brexit family law helpdesk

The International Family Law Group LLP (iFLG) have today launched a free Brexit family law helpdesk to provide information for family lawyers here and abroad and those involved in family court proceedings about the impact of Brexit on family law.

Brexit and national family law

This note sets out some preliminary reflections on the impact on domestic, national family law of the UK voting to leave the EU.

Brexit and international family law

This note sets out some preliminary reflections on the impact on international family law of the UK voting, by a close majority, to leave the EU.

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