You are here

Top Ten Myths in International Family Law

There are a lot of myths and misconceptions about international family law issues. Here is our top 10:

Practical Guidance for Dealing with Foreign Assets in National Cases

Partners Lucy Loizou and Michael Allum consider the ever-increasing international movement of people and families, a significant portion of financial cases in the family courts of England and Wales now involved assets located overseas. 

Double wedding, Double trouble: Why having two wedding ceremonies can cause problems later

An increasing number of couples have more than one marriage ceremony – one legal and one non-legal.  Perhaps they have a civil ceremony before jetting off to an exotic location for their wedding, or they may have a register office wedding followed or preceded by a religious ceremony. They might marry in the home country of one before having a ceremony in the home country of the other (or even a third country unrelated to either). 

Recorded Podcast with iFLG, London UK & Nicholes Family Lawyers, Melbourne Australia

Recorded by Partners David Hodson OBE MCIArb and Stuart Clark.

While these current times are certainly difficult, it is truly wonderful that we have been able to come together with Nicholes Family Lawyers and create this Podcast as an informative and valuable tool for those most at risk and vulnerable in our international community due to COVID-19. 

Financial provision after foreign divorce: is it time to reform the leave/permission procedure?

iFLG partner Michael Allum reviews the English family court’s power to make financial orders following foreign divorces (Part III) and asks whether it is time for the leave/permission filter mechanism to be reformed.   

The end of English Pension Sharing for couples abroad?

Partner Michael Allum asks the question, can a couple share a UK pension, if living and divorcing abroad.

International Res Judicata: Should Australian family law provide a second bite of the cherry when the first bite abroad was unfair or inadequate?

At the 17th Australian Family Lawyers' Conference in Fiji, David Hodson presented a paper, written with Michael Allum with considerable assistance from Sarah Basso as an Australian lawyer, giving a global overview of the circumstances in which some countries will grant financial provision even though a divorce and financial order has already been made in another country.  It asks whether the law should exist in other countries.

iFLG hosts the International Family Law Conference 2019

The International Family Law Group LLP and Anthony Gold Solicitors hosted their second annual International Family Law Conference yesterday (21 March 2019) in London.

The conference brought together specialist family lawyers from iFLG and Anthony Gold, as well as barristers who gave practical and updating insights into highly topical areas of international family law.

Potential implications of Brexit on pension sharing after an overseas divorce

Family analysis: Michael Allum and Stuart Clark, partners at The International Family Law Group LLP, highlight that obtaining effective pension sharing orders which will be recognised and implemented by pension providers in England and Wales after an overseas divorce is already a very complex and difficult area, and will become even more so in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

Oh Calderbank: which approach is the fairer of them all? Contrasting the English and Australian positions on costs offers

In the recent Australian decision of Laniga and Carron (No. 2)1 a costs order was made against the husband following the final financial order being more favourable to the wife than various without prejudice offers made by her and rejected by him. In contrast, an English court would have been unable to take the without prejudice offers into account and therefore would have been unable to make costs order on a similar basis.

Pages