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Top Ten Myths in International Family Law

There are a lot of myths and misconceptions about international family law issues. Here is our top 10:

Supreme Court Judgment in Villiers paves the way for English Maintenance Claims alongside a Scottish divorce

On 1 July 2020, the Supreme Court handed down judgment in the matter of Villiers. The appeal, which was brought by the husband, centered on whether the English court has jurisdiction to make a maintenance order under section 27 of the Matrimonial Causes Act 1973 in circumstances where the divorce between the parties took place in Scotland. We unpack the nature of the judgment and its wider ramifications in this article.

The Importance of Obtaining a Recognised Jewish Get when Jewish Couples Divorce and How the Courts Can Help

Partner Lucy Greenwood & trainee Solicitor Feriha Tayfur look at Jewish divorces ('Get') and potential solutions to family law practitioners and clients who need to ensure that a Jewish client obtains both a civil and religious divorce.

Practical Guidance for Dealing with Foreign Assets in National Cases

Partners Lucy Loizou and Michael Allum consider the ever-increasing international movement of people and families, a significant portion of financial cases in the family courts of England and Wales now involved assets located overseas. 

Should Cryptocurrency be part of my Divorce Settlement?

Cryptocurrency, though used by only a small part of the general population, is increasingly subject to litigation as its use becomes more widespread and it starts to figure in disputes, both commercial and personal. 

An increasing number of divorce cases feature cryptocurrency so it is more important than ever for the couple divorcing and their lawyers to be clear on the status of cryptocurrency and how it should be treated within a divorce case. 

Financial provision after foreign divorce: is it time to reform the leave/permission procedure?

iFLG partner Michael Allum reviews the English family court’s power to make financial orders following foreign divorces (Part III) and asks whether it is time for the leave/permission filter mechanism to be reformed.   

Open Offers after FDR's: is 21 days too soon?

Partner David Hodson OBE looks at a change to the family court rules, the impact it may have on practice, the encouragement to settle but asks if the default timing is too soon?

Financial Remedy cases amid the Covid-19 pandemic – will my case be heard?

This is of course a worrying time for all, legal practitioners and clients alike. However, clients and potential clients of the International Family Law Group LLP are assured that legal practitioners at the firm are keeping abreast of regular judicial guidance and they are continually exploring the various options open to clients involved in Financial Remedy proceedings during this time.

The impact of Coronavirus on Family Law: Key Questions Answered

The last month has seen a seismic shift in the way we live our lives: what we eat and how we get that food, how (and if) we can socialise with friends and family, whether we go out to work and even how often we walk the dog. Virtually every aspect of day to day life has altered in some shape or form. However, one thing that hasn’t changed is that family law disputes still need to be dealt with.

International Res Judicata: Should Australian family law provide a second bite of the cherry when the first bite abroad was unfair or inadequate?

At the 17th Australian Family Lawyers' Conference in Fiji, David Hodson presented a paper, written with Michael Allum with considerable assistance from Sarah Basso as an Australian lawyer, giving a global overview of the circumstances in which some countries will grant financial provision even though a divorce and financial order has already been made in another country.  It asks whether the law should exist in other countries.

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